Day 8: Kyoto, Gion Matsuri third day: Yoiyama

16 July

Weather:  37 C at noon, felt as 40 C 

Sunrise and streets

That morning we got up before the sunrise to catch the golden hour (best time to take pictures are as the sun rises and sets). We walked and photographed between streets till the Kamo River. 

It was truly a beautiful morning, I loved seeing how Kyoto is getting up, the shops still closed, people getting to their work slowly. Some people were sweeping their house front.

Near the river, there were young people just finishing the day, some still in their festival dresses.

Someone was sleeping with their luggage as the cushion, demonstrating how Japan is so safe. 

and another one in another corner

After walking hours in the streets, we decided that today is the day we finally gave up walking and rent bicycles for the transport. 

Early breakfasts day

Everywhere was closed except konbini stores, so we took small bites from Family Mart and walked more. Then McDonalds was the second place we went around 6 am but we needed a decent (or somewhat decent) coffee so once Starbucks opened around 7 am, we went there to have some coffee and truly wake up. 

Bicycle renting

Before coming I read in many blogs that Kyoto is very safe to bike, it was our agenda already. After breakfast, we rented bicycles from the nearest bike shop until the day we leave for Osaka. We preferred J-CYCLE for the renting, but I believe there are many more options.

Erhan, living many years in the Netherlands was already used to bicycles, but me? I had not cycled for many years, but you know what they say like using a bike, it is true 🙂 I remembered quickly. 

As soon as we rented the bicycles, we headed to Kyoto station for lunch. After spending the 2020 in isolation, looking back to photos from 2018 Kyoto it hurts my heart a little bit, seeing such a large crowd all together.

You will absolutely go to Kyoto station once or twice and if you have time to spare, go up and enjoy the unexpected beautiful terrace of the station with beautiful bamboo trees and a sky view.

GION MATSURI CONTINUES…  YOIYAMA

Gyoza festival

It was already the third day of Gion Matsuri. Today we decided to have dinner outside of the festival area, and I already know what to eat and where with the help of my workings before Japan! Gyozadokoro Takatsuji Sukemasa ぎょうざ処 亮昌 高辻本店! Near our home in Kyoto, and without leaving the festival area. These were the best Gyoza I have ever eaten in my life (and also will eat in Japan through the journey). If you ever go there don’t miss it, you’ll regret it.

Erhan’s Note: Eating it came with a manual of how to. There were several spices and sauces to enjoy, first without any spice, then with the spices respectively and also the store made it clear that the gyoza was made all with Japanese ingredients.

After our own gyoza festival, we headed to the festival area one more time, and enjoyed to the last drop.

We saw the floats at night one last time and carved the scenes in our memories with their shiny lights.

We weren’t of course the only ones around the floats, the crowd was again in the streets of Kyoto.

and the famous stalls were still working full capacity, after all people loves these stands.

and of course the officers were again there with their lightsaberish things.

***

The next day was the main event of the festival, another early start was waiting for us, therefore we decided call the night early on.

Total steps of the day: 10875

next post: The procession of the MATSURI

Day 7: Kyoto, Gion Matsuri second day: Yoi Yoiyama

15 July

Weather:  37 C at noon, felt as 40 C 

A very hot day ahead

It was so hot, it was impossible to head outside during the day, so we decided to chill in the house and rest a bit until the sun goes down.

Wifi problems: how to connect to the world, if wifi doesn’t work?

Although our Airbnb host offered internet that could also be used outside (which is very common in Japan), the internet was so slow that it wasn’t worth the trouble to carry it along. She tried to rectify the problem*, but it was a dead end. So in the end, we had to order our own device to connect to the internet.

* Erhan’s Note: Apparently it was a data cap issue of sorts. It should have resetted earlier but did’t or some other obscure reason. Remaining online while traveling across Japan is a challenge on its own. Thanks to the internet there are many guides out there on how to do it, and if I remember correctly there are many mobile internet sales booths right out of the airport arrivals gate.

Until the device showed up, we used the Starbucks and other cafe’s free wifi connections.

connection is everything

GION MATSURI CONTINUES… YOI YOIYAMA

This was the 2nd day of the festival. Before coming to Japan, after my thorough research I found out that the crowd starts to disappear after 9pm. As a photographer, the crowd is not always a bad thing if you wish to catch the true sense of the Matsuri.

So around 5pm we headed out the house, and started to walk to the streets where there are floats we didn’t catch the previous night. 

Sun was going down, the light was pretty good and the crowd was getting to the streets in that hour. A photographer’s dream hour: golden hour! 

Erhan’s note: I am an opportunist when it comes to posing in the golden hour.
sun setting slowly amidst the lanterns.
us enjoying the festival with lousy selfies:)
someone kindly took our photo and we had a neighbour 🙂

SUCH A CROWD

I don’t know the exact number of the people who attended the festival that year, but boy, it was crowded! 

But don’t worry, because Japanese know how to deal with this crowd, they are really prepared for the festival. There are many police officers guiding everyone with their lightsabers to right and left. Everyone -even the tourists- obey the rules (because it’s JAPAN).

MATSURI FOOD DAY 2

Today we knew how to move around and hit the food stalls immediately! And we were not alone with the same thing in mind, everybody was eating something delicious along the way to the floats.

some big calamaris on a stick 

We skipped the corn table but they were looking good

and of course takoyaki

The famous Kakigōri (かき氷) (Japanese shaved ice dessert flavored with syrup and a sweetener)

and many more options…

Total steps of the day: 12743

SPECIAL GION MATSURI ALBUM: DAY 1- 14 JULY

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Day 5: TOKYO to KYOTO, 1st Shinkansen experience

13 July 

Heading Towards Kyoto

Weather : 34C degrees at noon

We checked out from the hotel in the morning and from Okachimachi we went to Tokyo station. Since this would be our first Shinkansen experience, we took the tickets for the 11:50 train. Not too late not too early. We found the lockers and locked in our baggage. There were many lockers but since lots of people pass through busy stations, most of them were already filled, so it took a little time to find a non-occupied one. There are size options in the lockers, for our luggage we chose the 700 yen (app. 7 dollars) option. The rule is that your stuff can remain there for 3 days at this price but we needed only for a couple hours. We ended up settling for the price since there were no cheaper/shorter time options.

Tokyo station is really big*, so we decided to take a tour first and spotted the shops for Bento Boxes. It was so crowded with so many options, we had to walk at least 3 times the same shop. It was really hard to choose but we managed to make one, for me sushi and for Erhan is a really big Bento box and of course some drinks to accompany. Time to take the luggage and head to the train…

* Erhan’s Note: Although the main building of the Tokyo station looks old and relatively (especially relative to building around it) small, it  has a huge underground complex, something that is fairly common for most stations we saw in urban areas. It is really easy to get lost in them.

Finding Your Train in Tokyo Station

It was easy to find the train if you follow the line signs. The track/platform was written in your ticket in numbers along with other Japanese signs and your seat numbers (if you had a reserved ticket) If you have trouble finding which line, Google maps was working really well even within enclosed spaces such as train stations and shopping malls. I’m sure that you heard the story of the Japanese shinkansen conductor who had to apologize for coming early to the destination. This is true because they are known with their punctuality.* Fearing that we would miss the train in the madness of the station, we went there at least 20 minutes earlier. 

* Erhan’s Note: The entire nation seems to be functioning on a seamless consequent displacement of people, vehicles, and goods without a break. It is very much like what a healthy circulatory system should look like, even with the overcrowded public transport. 

One Additional thing that I learned before coming to Japan is that the track officers bow down to incoming and outgoing trains, as well as conductors within bowing when they exit individual train segments. A lot of bowing down happens in general in Japan, but I think in this case it functions as a memory tool, something that the officers and workers use to indicate that they are present, and that their duties are performed satisfactorily, to the point where they can bow out with relative assurance. Sort of a ritualistic non verbal mass communication punctuation that has both internal and external significance.

Silent, Efficient, and Fast: Cleaning Team of the Shinkansen

The train came, passengers exited, and the cleaners came to the train with their pink outfits and cleaning equipment. It was so ceremonial, fascinating to watch.* They left the clean train at the same time and at the exact time, waiting passengers started to step in.

* Erhan’s Note: Also a bit like formula 1 pit stop teams, but with elderly women in majority. Acting all in unison and precision. They went in and came out and everything was squeaky clean.

Shinkansen Food: Bento Time!

Erhan and I were so excited that the minute the train left the station, we opened our Bentos, even though we were not yet hungry.

Faster than a Speeding Bullet Train

Shinkansen speed is about 220 to 330km/h . And of course we tested the famous stability of the train along the tracks with our drinks to see if they would spill along the ride! The answer is of course no, not a movement.

Drinking on the train is always fun.

With this speed, it took approximately . 2.5 hours to go to Kyoto from Tokyo station (normally it’s almost an 8 hours drive) . At the 50th minute of the ride, we saw 富士山 (FUJI-SAN) a little bit, with its glorious curves. As Turkish persons, we are very keen to watch scenery along the way since Turkey has also an impressive list on its own. In this sense, this ride was almost poetic for us.

And finally KYOTO… A Dreamland in the Normal World.

Since we planned a long stay in Kyoto, we had arranged an Airbnb house there. The check out time was 4 pm, it was still early to go there, so we decided not to spend any money for lockers twice in the same day and took our luggage with us. 

Once we stepped into Kyoto station, a music welcomed us from far away, when we approached we saw there is a presentation of Gion Matsuri and the music is coming there, a special music to the festival.

After checking the presentation a little bit, we spent our time in Mister Donuts in the station. The donuts are always a good threat but a bad idea for the health at the same time:)

We followed the directions of our Airbnb host and took a bus in front of the station. Every first experience was a new lesson to us.*

* Erhan’s Note: We had heard so much about it, and were excited like little kids. Right off the train the station itself was quite impressive, and out of the station we were greeted by the Kyoto tower. 

Our first Airbnb experience in Kyoto

Following the directions of our Airbnb host, we found the bus to the house. Tip: In Japan, you pay the bus fare to the driver while descending but always prepare your money beforehand, otherwise everyone is waiting for you to pay and it’s very uncomfortable.*

Erhan’s Note: The bus experience was very traumatic for me because I was scrambling to get the exact change for the bus fare. I had to give it to the driver instead of depositing it in the box near the front exit, and he waved me off, probably saying it was ok. For some reason I felt the entire nation would be angry with me for failing such a simple and basic activity. Silly tourist…

Our house has only one bedroom including the entry, the kitchen and the living room:) but after the hotel room, we thought that it’s big and comfortable. It even had a balcony. In Turkey, we are used to taking out our shoes while entering home, but I know that most Americans or Europeans are not very used to this habit. Be prepared, in Japan, you will definitely take your shoes frequently, while entering houses, temples, onsens, some restaurants, even some ryokans…

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When we came Kyoto was extremely hot but windy, unfortunately the wind stopped after a while, and we faced the real Kyoto weather: hot and extremely humid.*

* Erhan’s Note: Calling it hot and humid is not enough. There needs to be another word for that. 

Time for a Small Crisis: Migraine in Japan

Erhan’s Note: One overlooked part of long travel excursions is what to do when crisis strikes. In a civilized country such as Japan there is always people that are willing to help especially in visibly bad crises, but small crises such as a simple headache may be more trouble than its worth. The language gap is huge for most people, especially because of the alphabet. Google translate helped a bit, but finding boxes of tiger jaw leg wing 1000 instead of simple ibuprofen can be taxing after a while.

I have chronic migraine, and the Kyoto humidity and the tiredness didn’t help it. Fortunately, there is 7’elevens near the house, so Erhan managed to get us some bread and cheese to calm down my stomach and my headache a little bit.* First cheese of the week (there is cheese in Konbini but it’s quite expensive compared to Turkey, therefore we avoided for a while but in our everyday life we used to eat cheese everyday for breakfast, thus 1 week of avoidance was enough:))

* Erhan’s Note: Like a brave little scout, I walked down the street, crossed the road, entered the konbini, bought the goods and exited the store and returned home. All by myself. 😀 

So we decided the that we will rest for the evening and prepare for the busy days ahead of us.

Total steps of the day: 4245 

Next: The famous GION MATSURI! stay tuned

Day 3 (cont.) TOKYO, Akihabara

11 July (continue)

After fully resting, we were ready to get back up there and enjoy the night in Akihabara.

Akihabara in the night 

Around 6 pm, we went back to Akihabara streets for more exploration.

Salaryman/woman

The work hours were over and everywhere we looked there were Japanese salary men and women wearing a white shirt and black trousers and skirts. They were dressed as if they were the same person all over. Also some engaged in an interesting behavior: a few of them would stand around in a circle and each would bow to one another before going their own ways. I later learned this is often the case when the group of salarymen go out with colleagues (drinking and eating) and then when it is time to go home they say their goodbyes in this manner, especially in the presence of more senior colleagues. 

Erhan’s Note: Travelling to other cities (especially Kyoto) we learned people often derided and ridiculed Tokyo way of living where salarymen style of career life is most visible. It was often told us that nobody wanted to live that life, like a robot, no offense.  

Tall building where work never stops in Tokyo

The Hook for the Maid Cafe

There were some girls dressed as maids to attract customers to the famous Maid Cafes. We already watched some videos about these cafes before leaving for Japan, so we weren’t too interested in these, but believe me, many tourists were attracted to these girls and entering the cafes. I know there is nothing fishy going in there but then again as a woman, I’m not sure that I’m too happy seeing these girls having to work like this, but that is my personal opinion of course.

The maid realized we were taking her photo and did a cross sign with her arms indicating she would rather not be pictured so we decided not to put the photo here.

Mario Kart

I’m sure that you have already heard Super Mario by Nintendo. And most of you may heard or seen in Instagram, the tourist driving around Tokyo routes with the Mario go Kart cars. By chance, we run into to their garage while walking from the hotel to the Akihabara station. It was fun to see this scene. Along the trip, we saw the karts around Tokyo many times, especially in Shibuya.

Go up for the cafes

Yes you heard it right, we weren’t used to go up for entering to a cafe but in Japan,many good cafes are situated in upper floors of an ordinary building, you just have to look up.

Neon Lights

While walking in Akihabara, we saw many neon boards, again showing some anime advertisement and so.

Famous SEGA Building (Eee, one of them)

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A Spicy finish to a Fine Night: First Real Ramen

Since we skipped lunch outside, we earned the right to choose a good place to eat. Now, the research I did before coming to Japan had worked its magic and we went to one of our starred places: Kikanbo Ramen https://kikanbo.co.jp/. There were 5 people in the queue waiting, it was pretty quick because there was a machine outside where you choose the ingredients you want in your ramen and your drink and pay on the spot to receive a ticket. Once you enter you give the ticket to the counter and voila! The ramen you wished you had while watching all these anime is in front of you! The store’s ramen style was from Hokkaido and they had a dark theme going in the shop, which immerses you immediately, and the drums play a war tune in the background which went tamtı tamtıtı, exciting your appetite while waiting. Some monstrous creature sculptures watch over you from their spots on the wall. We loved the atmosphere, and once we tasted the ramen, OMG! So delicious and extra spicy. First ramen (and one of the best throughout the journey) .

BEFORE – waiting in line, hungry and excited

Erhan slurping his ramen like a PRO!

a macro view to my ramen choice (the napkin in the video is very useful because the ramen was very hot, believe me you need one)

AFTER -It may not be a good photo but I wanted to share it anyway to show you how hot it was eating the ramen:)

***

Eventually we were overwhelmed by the experiences of the day and went back to the hotel early. You could see from our timeline again, details of our walk.

We didn’t sleep much again in the night, still adjusting to Japanese time?

Total steps of the day: 11644 

Day 2 (cont.)- TOKYO, Ueno Park

10 July (continued)

JOMON EXHIBITION

We saw the banners and we saw the posters. Some odd looking clay figures and pots that look deceptively simple. 10000 Years old prehistoric art in Japan. Even though we had not planned a visit, we had to see it; which was the best thing about a long trip: space for unplanned events and exploration!

If you ever have the chance to see it yourself, go for it! We saw the exquisite Dogu figures which resembled to little gingerbread people 🙂 (for more information Wikipedia) as well as many more interesting arts and artifacts in the complete collection of the museum.

Erhan’s note: From a game developer’s perspective, the Jomon period explained almost the entire history of Japanese game art and where most of their inspiration came from (especially the mainstream ones such as mario, zelda series etc.). It was especially surprising for me since I would have never thought to see the roots of digital art in a museum featuring 10.000 year old artifacts. In retrospect it makes total sense.

The rest of the collection was worth visiting too. Having been exposed to classical western and to a degree islamic classical art for the most part it was amazing to see what kept the Japanese inspired and busy through the ages.

Even though it seems from the photos that Erhan is defiling and pillaging the ancient artifacts like a hapless giant who hopes his wanton destruction goes unnoticed, these were only interactive parts of the exhibition, which made it more interesting.

Further interesting photography from within the museum as well as other details of our museum tour

Erhan’s note: The 4th picture looks totally like it is from a Mario game.

Of course we were not the only ones who spent the afternoon to avoid the sun, as always there were lots of people enjoying the AC and some even relaxing in the cool air of the museum by sleeping on the benches (during the journey we learned by experience that this behavior was totally normal for Japanese people).

Inside of the museum
the best place for sleeping, the hall of the museum
A little overwhelmed, I am sitting in a dark corner of the museum waiting for Erhan to shoot some more photos:)

First Curry Experience

For lunch, we saw some food trucks in front of the museum, we took some food and found some shade. 

Erhan’s note: This is where we ate our first curry and rice in Japan. II have to say it was not good. Mostly because it was from a food truck in front of a museum under sweltering summer heat. I have to admit I thought all Japanese curry had to taste amazing for some reason. I blame Ghibli animations.

In front of the museum and the food truck in question
our first curry in Japan, thankfully not the last (curry is so delicious normally)
Walking to the museum in the sun

University of Arts

After the museum, we continued to walk in the park and saw Tokyo University of Arts. Giving in to our curiosity, we walked in, (usually entering university grounds is a big issue in Turkey and prohibited or entirely regulated by private security) and had a lovely time in their outside cafeteria. Watching colorful characters of students and staff, and seeing the university life was an interesting experience that not many tourists get to enjoy. 

Erhan’s note: This statue by Rodin (more about it here), standing in the garden of the Tokyo University of the Arts, drew my attention. People who are familiar with Japanese manga, anime, and otherwise popular culture are probably aware of their comically effeminate yet perfectly proportioned male figure trope. I thought it was just a quirky comical effect found in popular culture references. A way of poking fun at western idea of human perfection. It was a welcome shock to see it in the bronze in front of me on a park near the university grounds. Although many such casts exist out there across the world, this statue had such a stark contrast that it stood out along with its un-Japanese surroundings, and undoubtedly has influenced many people who attended the Tokyo University of the Arts. It was about two westerners (well Istanbulites at the very least) seeing what Japanese think the western values uphold. This among many other things we saw across our travels explained so much about what inspires the Japanese culture. Incredible adoption of German cultural features in some cases, as well as an infatuation with things of the French nature. We even visited an Italian restaurant in Tokyo towards the end of our trip and I am glad we did. (more about that later :D)

University’s garden
University students enjoying a fine day
Students

Let’s enjoy the park from above

Even though our short visit was refreshing, we had spent quite some energy walking around. We still needed to sit and drink something, and found a rooftop restaurant in a building within the park (Ueno Seiyoken), after a long day the first Japanese beer was rewarding and made up for all the exhausting steps.

small erhan’s note: my beard looks at tip top shape here… it gradually gets rowdier towards the end of trip. This blog is worth reading just to witness that if not for anything else 😀

Erhan’s note: I remember checking google to find a decent restaurant nearby and not coming up with much given we were in the middle of the park. We walked into the building that we thought was a restaurant but had to climb up to the top floor to find it. There is something that gives you the butterflies about not being completely sure where you will end up, but the relief when you arrive in a welcoming place as often the case is in japan is completely worth it.

The meal wasn’t anything to write home about, but from up there you can see the entire park, all green with water lillies, and the rest of the metropolitan city scape; it was a special moment of us that marked the first excursion in Japan, first real day of our adventure.

View of the park from the rooftop
View of the park from the rooftop
another perspective from Erhan’s camera

Erhan’s note: And it had gone spectacularly well for a first day too. 😀

We decided to finish our day after the beer time and to walk straight to the hotel but we were intrigued to see our first gashapon and claw machines in the wild, to be frank they are quit tempting even though you know it’s nearly impossible to win something worthwhile.

We passed some busy streets while walking to the hotel, enjoyed our first evening stroll.

When we reached the hotel, since the room was too tiny and no window could be opened, it was a little difficult for us to sleep with the AC (and we were still adjusting to the Japan time). 

our hotel room window

Have you been to Ueno Park? Did you enjoy it too? Did you see the full bloom? Comment below, let us know more!

Did you know that Google maps keeps your walking history? We learned that recently, here is the crazy summary of our 10th July.

total steps of the day: 17920 steps

The next day is another Japanese famous place: Akihabara…

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Day 2: TOKYO, Ueno Park

10 July – weather: 32 °C at noon

Erhan’s note: We woke up, took the comically tiny shower, and headed downstairs for breakfast. It was a combination of western/japanese sort of canned hotel breakfast type. They had little croissants, some miso soup, natto, rice, and some pickles on the buffet. First time having tasted natto (fermented sticky soybeans with a wet sock taste and consistency), I understood why people have different opinions on it.

Even though Erhan seemed to enjoy the taste of sticky wet sock, I was left a bit wanting after the breakfast. We googled our environment and decided to go to the Ueno Park: a great destination for the first day orientation. We grabbed our cameras and wandered out.

Ueno Park

It is a big park with a lake in the middle covered by water lilies. Unfortunately, we had missed their bloom, but it was already beautiful, covering the entire lake there was a sea of green leaves. I couldn’t imagine how beautiful they would be in their bloom (maybe a goal for the next time?). 

Ueno Park

Mystery of the Konbini Onigiri

For lunch, we took our Onigiri (Japanese rice balls where there is a flavored filling inside) from the nearby Konbini (Japanese convenience stores, like 7eleven, Lawsons, Familymart). I already had a favorite one: Tuna Mayo. I wouldn’t think something so simple would be so delicious (oishii: a word for delicious we would often use for the entire trip). By the way, being new in Japan, this was already our second time tasting the store sold onigiri and we were struggling with the packaging. They all had this double plastic wrapping with the seaweed in between, so that the rice ball would not touch the seaweed (Nori) unless it is opened. The reason was simple, the nori would get soggy and stick to the rice ball immediately once you opened the package, so it had to be kept isolated. Once we learned how to slowly unwrap it and hold the nori in a way to pinch the rice ball so it wraps around it, it was no longer a frustrating mess of rice and seaweed mush.

the Onigiri counter at the Konbini

First Temple Visit (temple/shrine count #1)

To our surprise our walk in the park led to our first temple visit! Benten-do Temple. 

Erhan’s note: We quickly learned that in Japan most parks have a shrine/temple or both given how the Japanese religious structure encompasses nature in a way. We further later learned that Japanese tend to build shrines everywhere nature or not. I had heard that some tourists experience Shrine Fatigue, a term which encompasses the disinterest they start feeling after visiting shrine after temple after shrine after temple. I was quite ok with it personally.

You may see from the photos how excited we were to come across it. The very thing we only saw in so many other photos was standing there in real life in front of us. 

Benten-do Buddhist Temple
Daikokutendo next to Benten-do Temple

We went straight to the booth of temple where they sold charms and temple related things. We immediately bought our goshuincho (御朱印帳), the special book in which you collect goshuin (御朱印) (seal stamps that worshippers and visitors to Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples collect), and of course first goshuin was made there. Btw, you make a donation to take a goshuin, it’s normally around 300 yen, app. 3 dollars. 

Erhan’s note: I think we learned about the goshuincho during our preparation phase. So we already knew we should purchase it the moment we saw it. The booklets are beautiful for the most part, covered with a silk weave stitched on the covers, a depiction of whatever makes that particular temple or shrine you bought it from famous. Some booklets are really nice and some are rather minimalistic. Later in our trip, we also learned that even though most touristic temples charge you a fee for a stamp and signature, local temples where tourists rarely go to do not ask for a fee. Some temples just leave pre-signed leaflets to put in between your booklet, and a donation box nearby.

In the temples and shrines you may also purchase fortunes,  boxes, wrappings, charms, inscriptions in any form or method you can imagine.

Erhan’s note: I think we should make an additional blog post covering temples and what you can find in them.

me holding my first fortune 🙂

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Life in Ueno Park

We were already impressed with the local people when we saw this man casually chatting with his friends while playing/feeding the birds, he was so natural and nonchalant about it, he didn’t even look at them. 

the man and the sparrow

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Did I say it was a hot day? On the first day of our trip we had already experienced the famous humidity and heat of the Japanese summer. We started looking for some interior coolness.

While walking in the park we found out that there were many museums in the area, perfect for cooling down. Namely Tokyo National Museum, the National Museum for Western Art, the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum and the National Science Museum. The park was also home to the Ueno Zoo. As appreciators of fine art, our first choice was The Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum. It was closed, so we chose to visit Tokyo National Museum.

And what a luck! we saw the banners for the “JOMON” exhibition, we wandered in excitedly.

To be continued in the next post…